What is Corneal Cross-Linking?

Tuesday, May 16th, 2017, 4:47 pm

Cross-linking is a procedure where UV light and riboflavin applied to the corneal surface strengthen collagen within the cornea. This helps to stabilize ectasia, a bulging of the eye’s surface, caused from progressive Keratoconus, other corneal disease or in rare complications of LASIK surgery.

What you need to know about corneal cross-linking?

Corneal cross-linking is a minimally invasive, in-office treatment for ectasia. In April of 2016, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved the corneal cross-linking as a means of treating patients with Keratoconus and ectasia.

Keratoconus is a progressive thinning and distortion of the cornea, that is vision threatening. It is the most common corneal dystrophy in the US, affecting approximately 170,000 people. Keratoconus changes the corneal curvature, resulting in blurred vision that is difficult to correct with spectacle lenses. This progressive thinning and weakening can result in significant visual loss and may lead to corneal transplants.

How does corneal cross-linking work?

In this procedure, the doctor applies a liquid form of vitamin B2 on the cornea and exposes it to ultraviolet light to strengthen the bonds of the cornea. This minimally invasive procedure works to shorten and thicken the collagen fibers, which stabilizes the thinning of the cornea and improves vision. The procedure does not require any surgical incisions, and corneal cross-linking may produce long-term and permanent results.

Corneal cross-linking:

  • makes new corneal collagen cross-links
  • shortens and thickens collagen fibrils
  • stiffens the cornea

AVC Corneal Cross-Linking
At Advanced Vision Care, our doctors will complete an examination to determine whether you are a candidate for this procedure. With corneal cross-linking, we aim to restore and strengthen the vision of our patients who struggle with ectasia. We are committed to giving you individualized care that provides you with the clearest vision possible.

 

back to top


Category: Crosslinking Trial, Welcome


Leave a Reply




Contact Us

Captcha